Fermenting Green Beans and Carrots

When fermenting vegetables, it’s essential to use vegetables from a direct source. Some organic produce in the super markets are grown with some chemicals, or are sprayed with chemicals after they’re grown so that they last longer on the shelf. They might be grown better then conventional, but they’re not vegetables I would ferment with.

Here’s a video I found on fermenting green beans, which are coming into season. Tutti Frutti Farms just started getting their crop in, and we had them for our family boxes last week.

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What was helpful about this video, and the main point I’m sharing it, is something really simple. She blanches the green beans before she ferments it. If I had realized I could do that before, I would’ve tried that when I had an abundance of cauliflower. It’s funny how that didn’t pop in my mind since, I blanch medicinal mushrooms before I add them to the ferment. My squash ferments are excellent without blanching, I definitely wouldn’t blanch summer squash, or zucchini. Cauliflower and green beans, though, makes sense, and I’ll give it a try with cauliflower next time I have plenty.

I personally don’t use starter culture. I don’t want to use something powdered that comes in a packet online. I don’t use whey, because when I sell my ferments I want to be able to have it available for everyone, and whey comes from dairy. You can also use juice from another ferment to kickstart your ferment. I usually don’t even do that. I use himalayan salt. 

If you want to pick up a ferment with quality ingredients, approved by me, The “Soup Sorceress”, stop by Mimosa Cafe or the Country Natural Food Store in Topanga. I had a gift of an over load of squash, so I made this for sale at a very low price, and it won’t last long. The price will be higher next time. So give this tastiness a try! Fermented yellow sunburst squash. You can use it to top off your soups, as seen on my instagram, @soupsorceresskali

I absolutely love pickles, but I love this even more. It’s sour, tasty, and I crave the juice. I also love to add in a few raw almonds in the juice, and snack on those. Wow!

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Is the equivalent of what we would call someone a “sweet tooth”, a “sour and savory tooth”? Or maybe a “veggie tooth”?

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Veggie Desserts

I was happy to see this review of Veggie Desserts & Cakes, from “Food To Glow“, sharing a variety of creative and tasty ways you can use vegetables in desserts.  How fun for us veggie lovers!

I’ve posted about butternut squash cake, and how we used half the sugar, and it reminded me of pound cake. My pumpkin pie recipe, has a few flavors of “frosting”, using mint, beets, and carrots. Although, I mainly choose no sugar or flour in my food, this book looks awesome, and I’m sure will inspire new ideas!

Celebrate Veggies!

A delicate apple-flavoured sponge, topped with a zesty apple icing and, although there is quite a bit of kale, the flavour doesn’t overpower the other ingredients. From the debut cookbook by Kate Hackworthy. Veggie Desserts Cakes, the debut baking cookbook by top UK food blogger, Kate Hackworthy, celebrates rather than hides vegetables. More than […]

via Kale and Apple Cake with Apple Icing from Veggie Desserts Cakes {review and recipe} — food to glow